GE Fuel Oil Treatment Selected for Iraqi Power Plant

GE (NYSE: GE) has signed a contract with Iraq’s Ministry of Electricity to supply an advanced fuel oil treatment technology, FuelSolv, to help enhance the reliability and productivity of the Al-Quds power plant on the outskirts of Baghdad.

“The Al-Quds power station provides much-needed electricity for Iraq and GE’s innovative gas turbine technology and fuel oil performance solution can help keep the Al-Quds power plant running at peak performance and efficiency throughout the year,” said Joseph Anis, GE Energy’s president for the Middle East.

“This agreement is further testament to GE’s ongoing commitment to support Iraq in boosting its power generation capacity and infrastructure growth so as to supply reliable electricity for Iraq’s people.”

GE is supplying 2,000 tons of FuelSolv, a proprietary fuel oil treatment product that can be added to a variety of power plant fuels, including heavy oil, to protect and improve the performance of power generation equipment.

This contract is the largest fuel oil treatment contract GE has signed in the Middle East and marks GE’s second fuel treatment order in Iraq, following a contract signed last year for the supply of 500 tons of FuelSolv to the Baghdad South power plant. FuelSolv was developed by the water and process technologies business unit of GE Power & Water.

The fuel additive is designed to facilitate safe, continuous operation of the GE heavy-duty gas turbines at the Al-Quds plant. When running at full operation with its six GE Frame 9E heavy-duty gas turbines, the Al-Quds plant generates 800 megawatts for the Iraq electricity grid.

GE has a long history of supporting Iraqi infrastructure needs in power generation, oil and gas, water processing, aviation and healthcare and more than 120 GE power turbines are installed in the country today.

GE has been active in the Middle East since the 1930s and has management and project management offices as well as local repair and service facilities to serve customers throughout the region.

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