Yazidis Wary amid Stalled Sinjar Offensive

“Unfortunately, nothing has been done” in the numerous small towns and villages in the area “liberated on Dec. 17, 2014. No services have been restored,” he said.

He noted that the area officially falls under the remit of the central government in Baghdad, not the KRG.

“None of the families have returned,” he said, “because there is no electricity, municipal services or health care centers. They have just become safe, but that’s all. They have also found 11 mass graves in the area, the latest of which they found last Monday [March 30], with 29 bodies.”

Flattened roofs dot the sides of the road toward the mountains. During a brief drive through some of these villages, Al-Monitor observed a limited human presence. The only people to be seen were those inside a few shops selling fruit and snacks, with customers in fatigues and variegated Kurdish party flags overhead.

Domle has worked extensively with Yazidi women and girls who have escaped from IS captivity. His book on the subject will be published in the coming days in the local language, with plans to publish it in English in the near future. He said, “Now, the number of women, men and children who have escaped [IS] totals more than 1,220.”

He added, “We also have the names of more than 3,500 men, women and children who are still missing after being captured” by IS last year.

Domle told Al-Monitor of a new program that would relocate many of the women and girls who suffered torture and rape at the hands of IS to Germany for health and psychological support.

“The first group arrived [in Germany] last Saturday,” he told Al-Monitor earlier this month. The second group will leave April 15. "This is the result of an official agreement between the KRG and Baden state in Germany to take more than 600 women and children.”

3 Responses to Yazidis Wary amid Stalled Sinjar Offensive